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CATALOGUE OF JANE BOWLES' LITERARY WORKS

EARLY, PUBLISHED AND UNPUBLISHED JANE BOWLES WORKS,

SHORT STORIES, SKETCHES AND PLAYS

(In Chronological Order)

Le Phaéton Hypocrite (1935–36). This was Jane Bowles's first work; an unpublished novel written in French. (manuscript lost)

 

Two Serious Ladies (New York: Alfred Knopf, Inc., 1943; London: Peter Owen Ltd., 1965, 1997, 2003; London: Penguin, 2000; London: Sort Of Books, 2010, paperback, with an introduction by Lorna Sage and a memoir by Truman Capote). French edition: Deux Dames sérieuses, translated from the English by Jean Autret (Paris: Gallimard, 1969)  (novel)

 

"A Guatemalan Idyll", Cross Section 1944: A Collection of New American Writing, edited by Edwin Seaver (New York: L.B. Fischer, 1944). (short story)

 

"A Day in the Open", Cross Section 1945: A Collection of New American Writing, edited by Edwin Seaver (New York: L.B. Fischer, 1945); The Granta Book of the American Short Story, edited by Richard Ford (1991 and subsequent printings). (short story)

 

"Plain Pleasures", Harper's Bazaar, February 1946. (short story)

 
In the Summer House, (Act I), Harper's Bazaar, April 1947. (play)
 
"Camp Cataract", Harper's Bazaar, September 1949. (short story)
 
"East Side: North Africa", Mademoiselle, April 1951: 134+. (short story)
 

In the Summer House, Best Plays of 1953–1954, edited by Louis Kronenberger, New York: Dodd, Mead, 1954. ("In the Summer House was presented at the Hedgerow Theater in Moylan, Pennsylvania in 1951, directed by Jasper Deeter, and again in Ann Arbor, Michigan. In New York City the play was produced by Oliver Smith with music composed by Paul Bowles; the performances were from December 29, 1953 through February 13, 1954.)

 
In the Summer House, New York: Random House, 1954. (play)
 

At the Jumping Bean, an unfinished play which Jane Bowles began writing during a 1955 trip to Ceylon. Paul Bowles "found it in with her notebooks after her death." 12 pages. (unpublished play)

 

"A Stick of Green Candy", completed 1949; published in Vogue magazine, February 15, 1957 (short story)

 

Plain Pleasures (London: Peter Owen Ltd., 1966; paperback edition, 2004). (short-story collection)

 

The Collected Works of Jane Bowles (New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1966)

 

A Quarreling Pair, a puppet play performed in 1945. (Mademoiselle, December 1966, p. 116)

 

"The Courtship of Janet Murphy" (Antaeus, Spring 1972)

 

"Emmy Moore's Journal", 1973 (short story written shortly before her death). (New York: The Paris  Review, Issue 56, Spring 1973)

 

Going to Massachusetts, 1973 (unfinished novel)

 

Feminine Wiles. Introduction written by Tennessee Williams. (Short stories and sketches include: "Andrew", "Emmy Moore's Journal", "Going to Massachusetts", "Curls and a quiet country place" and "At the Jumping Bean" (a play) (Santa Barbara: Black Sparrow Press, 1976)

 

"Two Scenes" (Antaeus, 1977; The Best American Short Stories 1978, edited by Ted Solotaroff and Shannon Ravenel, Houghton Mifflin, 1978)

 

"Three Scenes" (Antaeus, Autumn, 1977)

 

My Sister's Hand in Mine. Introduction written by Truman Capote. (New York: The Ecco Press, 1978, 1985); My Sister's Hand in Mine: The Collected Works of Jane Bowles, with a preface by Joy Williams and the introduction by Truman Capote (New York: Farrar, Straus & Giroux, 2005). Contains: Two Serious Ladies, In the Summer House, "Plain Pleasures", "Plain Pleasures", "Everything is Nice", "A Guatemalan Idyll", "Camp Cataract", "A Day in the Open", "A Quarreling Pair", "A Stick of Green Candy". Other stories by Jane Bowles included are: "Andrew", "Emmy Moore's Journal" and "Going to Massachusetts". And from Jane Bowles' notebooks: "The Iron Table", "Lila and Frank", and "Friday".

 

The Collected Works of Jane Bowles (London: Peter Owen Ltd., 1984)

 

Out in the World: Selected Letters of Jane Bowles, 1935–1970, edited by Millicent Dillon (Santa Barbara: Black Sparrow Press, 1985)

 

"Señorita Córdoba", edited by Millicent Dillon and Paul Bowles (Berkeley, California: The Threepenny Review, VI:1, Spring 1985)

 

"A Day in the Open", You’ve Got to Read This: Contemporary American Writers Introduce Stories That Held Them in Awe, edited by Ron Hansen and Jim Shepard (New York: HarperPerennial Library, October 1994; The Granta Book of the American Short Story, edited by Richard Ford (New York: Penguin / Granta October 1998)

 

Everything is Nice: The Collected Works of Jane Bowles (New York: Random House, 1989; London: Virago Press, 1989 (Collected Stories)

 

goNza magilla: Ein Leben in Briefen. Letters of Jane Bowles, translated into German. (Bonn, Germany: Sans Soleil, 1997)

 

Jane & Paul Bowles, Lettres: 1946-1970, translated from English into French by Elisabeth Peellaert, with a preface by Michel Bulteau (Paris: Hachette Littératures, 2005)

 
A Stick of Green Candy: Stories by Jane Bowles and Denton Welch, with images by the artist Colter Jacobsen). (London: Four Corners Books, 2009). This book includes "A Stick of Green Candy" and "Camp Cataract" by Jane Bowles  (Short Stories)
 
Jane Bowles: últimos años (1967–1973), Rodolfo Häsler, editor. (Málaga, Espagne: Consulado del Mar, Instituto Municipal del Libro, Áero de Cultura. Ayuntamiento de Málaga, 2010). Bilingual Edition, in English and Spanish.
 
Jane Bowles, Una Pareja en Discordia, introducción y traducción Luis García de Ángela (Málaga: Instituto Municipal del Libro, Áero de Cultura. Ayuntamiento de Málaga, 2010)
 
Two Serious Ladies (London: Sort Of Books, 2010, paperback, with an introduction by Lorna Sage and a memoir by Truman Capote)
 
Everything is Nice: Collected Stories, Sketches and Plays, with an Introduction by Paul Bowles entitled "Ambivalence was her natural element"). This volume contains nearly all of Jane Bowles' writings with the exception of Two Serious Ladies. Included are fragments from her two unpublished novels, Out in the World ("A Guatemalan Idyll", "A Day in the Open" and "Señorita Córdoba") and Going to Massachusetts ("The Courtship of Janet Murphy"). The stories included from Plain Pleasures are "Plain Pleasures", "Everything is Nice", "Camp Cataract", "A Quarreling Pair" and "A Stick of Green Candy". Fragments from Jane Bowles' notebooks included are "Looking for Lane", "Laura and Sally", "The Iron Table", "Lila and Frank" and "At the Jumping Bean"; and six of Jane Bowles' letters. (Sort Of Books, London, December 2012, paperback)
 

JANE BOWLES: REFERENCES

(Alphabetical by Author)

 

Carolyn J. Allen, "The Narrative Erotics of Two Serious Ladies"

 

Mark T. Bassett, "Imagination, Control and Betrayal in Jane Bowles's 'A Stick of Green Candy'" Studies in Short Fiction, 24:1 (1987): 25-29

 

Stephen Benz, "'The Americans Stick Pretty Much in Their Own Quarter': Jane Bowles and Central America"

 

Gena Dagel Caponi, "The Unfinished Jane Bowles" (See: Jenny Skerl, below.)

 

Truman Capote, "Truman Capote Introduces Jane Bowles" (Mademoiselle, December 1966, p. 115)

 

Peter G. Christensen, "Family Dynamics in Jane Bowles's In the Summer House"

 

Millicent Dillon, "Jane Bowles: Experiment as Character." Breaking the Sequence: Women's Experimental Fiction (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1989): 140-147

 

Millicent Dillon, "Keeper of the Flame". (The New Yorker January 27, 1997: 27-28)

 

Millicent Dillon, You Are Not I: A Portrait of Paul Bowles (Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press, 1998)

 

Stacey d'Erasmo, "The Exiled Heart". (New York: Out magazine: May 1999): 69-73, 118, 120

 
Ruth Fainlight, "Jane and Sylvia" (London: The Times Literary Supplement, December 12, 2003; New York: Crossroads: Journal of the Poetry Society of America, Number 61, Spring 2004). Download and view a PDF file of this article. (A memoir of Ruth Fainlight's friendships with Jane Bowles and Sylvia Plath, also describing the times in the early 1960s when Fainlight and her husband writer Alan Sillitoe lived in Tangier, Morocco.)
 

Kathy Justice Gentile, "'The Dreaded Voyage Into the World': Jane Bowles and her Serious Ladies" (Studies in American Fiction, Volume 22, Number 1, Spring 1994)

 

Charlotte Goodman, "Mommy Dearest: Mothers and Daughters in Jane Bowles's In the Summer House and Other Plays by Contemporary Women Writers"

 

Francine du Plessix Gray, “Jane Bowles Reconsidered” (The New York Times, May 19, 1978)

 

William A. Henry III,  A review of "In the Summer House" (Time magazine, August 16, 1993, p. 61)

 

Allen Hibbard, "Out in the World: Reconstructing Jane Bowles's Unfinished Novel." The Library Chronicle (Austin: University of Texas) 25:2 (1994): 121-169

 

Allen Hibbard, "Toward a Postmodern Aesthetic: Indeterminacy, Instability, and Inconclusiveness
in Out in the World"

 

John Hopkins, The Tangier Diaries, 1962-1979 (San Francisco: Cadmus Editions, 1998)

 

Brenda Knight, "Jane Bowles: A Life at the End of the World." Women of the Beat Generation: The
Writers, Artists and Muses at the Heart of a Revolution
. (New York: Conan Press, 1998, pp. 18-27)

 

Marcy Jane Knopf, "Bi-nary Bi-Sexuality: Jane Bowles' Two Serious Ladies." Representing Bisexualities: Subjects and Cultures of Fluid Desire. Donald E. Hall and Maria Pramaggiore, editors (New York University Press, 1996, pp. 142-164)

 

Andrew M. Lakritz, "Jane Bowles's Other World." Old Maids to Radical Spinsters: Unmarried Women in the Twentieth Century Novel. Laura L. Doan, editor (Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1991, pp. 213-214)

 

Robert E. Lougy, "The World and Art of Jane Bowles (1917-1973)" (CEA Critic, 49: 2-4, 1986-1987: pp. 157-173)

 

Robert E. Lougy, "'Some Fun in the Mud': Decrepitude and Salvation in the World of Jane Bowles"

 

John Maier, "Exchanging Strangeness: Fiction of Jane Bowles and Leila Abouzeid" in Mirrors on the Maghrib: Critical Reflections on Paul and Jane Bowles and Other American Writers in Morocco. edited by R. Kevin Lacey and Francis Poole (Delmar, NY: Caravan Books, 1996, pp. 151-86)

 

John Maier, "Jane Bowles and the Semi-Oriental Woman." A Tawdry Place of Salvation: The Art of Jane Bowles, edited by Jennie Skerl (Carbondale and Edwardsville, Illinois: Southern Illinois University Press, 1997, pp. 83-101)

 

Jane Miller, "Cataract: Appreciating Jane Bowles", (HOW(ever), Vol. 5, No. 1, October, 1988)

 

Michelle Pearce, "Don’t Tell Mother", (American Theater, 10:9, 1993, p. 11)

 
Joan Schenkar, The Talented Miss Highsmith: The Secret Life and Serious Art of Patricia Highsmith (New York: St.  Martin's Press, 2009)  [Contains numerous references to Jane Bowles and visits to Morocco.]
 

Carol Shloss, "Jane Bowles in Uninhabitable Places: Writing on Cultural Boundaries"

 

Jennie Skerl, "Sallies into the Outside World: A Literary History of Jane Bowles" A Tawdry Place of Salvation (Carbondale and Edwardsville, Illinois: Southern Illinois University Press, 1997, pp. 1-18)

 

Jennie Skerl, A Tawdry Place of Salvation: The Art of Jane Bowles (Carbondale and Edwardsville, Illinois: Southern Illinois University Press, 1997). [Criticism and Interpretation]. Contents include: Preface. 1. "Sallies into the Outside World: A Literary History of Jane Bowles", Jennie Skerl, pp. 1-18; 2. "The Narrative Erotics of Two Serious Ladies ", Carolyn J. Allen, p. 19; 3. "The Americans Stick Pretty Much in Their Own Quarter": Jane Bowles and Central America, Stephen Benz, p. 37; 4. "Family Dynamics in Jane Bowles's In the Summer House, Peter G. Christensen, p. 49; 5. "Mommy Dearest: Mothers and Daughters in Jane Bowles's In the Summer House and Other Plays by Contemporary Women Writers", Charlotte Goodman, p. 64; 6. "Sister Act: A Reading of Jane Bowles's Puppet Play", Regina Weinreich, p. 77; 7. "Jane Bowles and the Semi-Oriental Woman", John Maier, p. 8; 8. "Jane Bowles in Uninhabitable Places: Writing on Cultural Boundaries", Carol Shloss, p.102; 9. "'Some Fun in the Mud': Decrepitude and Salvation in the World of Jane Bowles", Robert E. Lougy, p. 119; 10. "The Unfinished Jane Bowles", Gena Dagel Caponi, p. 134; 11. "Toward a Postmodern Aesthetic: Indeterminacy, Instability, and Inconclusiveness in Out in the World", Allen E. Hibbard, p.153; and a bibliography.

 

Jennie Skerl, "The Legend of Jane Bowles: Stories of the Female Avant-Garde" (Texas Studies in Literature and Language, 1999 Fall; 41, 3, pp. 262-79)

 

Claude Nathalie Thomas, "On Translating Paul (and Jane and Mrabet)" (Journal of Modern Literature, Volume 23, Number 1, Fall 1999, pp. 35-43)

 

Sherill Tippins, February House (Boston / New York: Houghton Mifflin, 2005)

 

Edith H. Walton, “Fantastic Duo (Review of Two Serious Ladies)”, The New York Times, May 9, 1943

 

Regina Weinreich, "Sister Act: A Reading of Jane Bowles's Puppet Play"

 

BIOGRAPHIES OF JANE BOWLES

 

Millicent Dillon,  A Little Original Sin: The Life and Work of Jane Bowles.  New York: Holt, Rinehard and Winston, 1981 (Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press, 1998)

 

Jens Rosteck, Jane und Paul Bowles: Leben ohne anzuhalten, (München: Goldman Verlag, September 2005) [in German]

 

BIBLIOGRAPHY

 

Lawrence Shifreen,  Jane Bowles: A Bibliography  (College Park, Maryland: Sun & Moon Press, 1989)

 

JANE BOWLES COLLECTIONS, ARCHIVES,

LETTERS, PAPERS, DOCUMENTS, MANUSCRIPTS AND PHOTOGRAPHS

 

The Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center (HRC), Jane Auer Bowles Collection, University of Texas at Austin

 
Archiva de La Residencia Estudiantes, Madrid, Spain. Photographs from the Collection of Emilio Sanz de Soto / Pepe Carleton
 

Millicent Dillon Papers, The Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center (HRC), University of Texas at Austin

 

University of Delaware Library, Special Collections Department, Paul Bowles Collection. University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware

 

The Swiss Foundation for Photography, Winterthur, Switzerland

 

OTHER RESOURCES

 
Short Biography of Jane Bowles by Millicent Dillon
 

Photographs of Jane Bowles, Friends and Associates

 
Recommended Resources for Jane Bowles and Paul Bowles
 

Books by and about Jane Bowles

 

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